0

The dirty secret is out - The Browns

The cat's out of the bag. Finally, something that we long suspected, but was never acknowledged, was confirmed by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in a New York Times Magazine interview: the dirty connection between the Roe v. Wade abortion decision and eugenics.

"Yes, the ruling about that surprised me," Ginsburg said while discussing the 1980 Supreme Court decision that upheld the Hyde Amendment, barring Medicaid funding for abortions.

"Frankly I had thought that at the time Roe was decided, there was concern about population growth and particularly growth in populations that we don't want to have too many of. So that Roe was going to be then set up for Medicaid funding for abortion ... "

To set the stage for the historic decision in 1973, one must look back at the radical ideas which were being tossed about by radical intellectuals and Eastside elites during the late '60s and early '70s.

"Population Bomb," a bestselling book by Paul Ehrlich, predicted mass starvation unless radical measures were taken. It was released in 1968. During the 1970s, a cause célèbre was made of overpopulation and eugenics, (forced abortion and sterilization) to "save the planet."

Hysteria ran rampant about an impending population explosion, a shortage of resources and its devastating impact on the environment. Sounding a clarion call in their book, "Euroscience: Population, Resources, Environment," were co-authors Ehrlich, his wife, Anne, and John P. Holdren, now Barack Obama's Science Czar.

In "Euroscience," they advocate the need for "compulsory population-control laws." They argue that "the population crisis" has already become "sufficiently severe to endanger the society."

Five decades before Holdren and Ehrlich were proposing forced abortion and sterilization, the founder of Planned Parenthood, Margaret Sanger, was singing the praises of eugenics, saying in 1921, "Eugenics is...the most adequate and thorough avenue to the solution of racial, political and social problems." This is the same Margaret Sanger who proposed a law that, "No woman shall have the legal right to bear a child... without a permit for parenthood." Planned Parenthood is now the largest provider of abortions in the U.S.

Holdren's formal titles are "Director of the White House Office of Science Technology Policy," "Assistant to the President for Science and Technology" and "Co-Chair of the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology."

Holdren is Obama's point person on science and technology as it affects federal and international policies. No wonder cheap abortions are part of the Obama health-care reform.

Obama told the Planned Parenthood Action fund in July 2008, that "reproductive care is essential care, basic care, so it is at the center, the heart of the [health-care] plan that I propose." Upon questioning, an Obama spokesman later clarified that reproductive care includes abortion.

In his essay written in 1922 titled "Eugenics and Other Evils," English writer G.K. Chesterton addressed the growing popularity of eugenics within England's ruling classes. "I know it is praised with high professions of idealism and benevolence; with silver-tongued rhetoric about purer motherhood and a happier posterity. But that is only because evil is always flattered, [by] the Gracious Ones. But I know that it numbers many disciples whose intentions are entirely innocent and humane ... But that is only because evil always wins through the strength of its splendid dupes ..."

Ironically, both Obama and Ginsburg are members of groups of people who have historically been chosen to be eliminated by proponents of eugenics, blacks and Jews. Of course, it is widely known that Hitler embraced eugenics and the destruction of the Jewish race, but the history goes back to their early days. For example, the stories of saving of baby Moses from Pharaoh's decree to kill all male Hebrew babies and Queen Esther rescuing all the Jews from extermination quickly come to mind. Blacks have frequently been the spoken target of eugenics by racists such as Sanger.

"The wisest thing in the world is to cry out before you are hurt," Chesterton said. "It is no good to cry out after you are hurt; especially it you are mortally hurt ... but sound historians know that most tyrannies have been possible because men moved too late. It is often essential to resist a tyranny before it exists."

The Browns are bestselling authors. Together, they write a national weekly column distributed exclusively by Cagle Cartoons newspaper syndicate. To comment on this column, e-mail browns@caglecartoons.com.