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Rotary Club race benefits local charities

Photo by Casey Case
Some runners were dressed in shorts, for the Henry County Rotary Club's third annual Jingle Jog, held on the McDonough Square, on Dec. 4. The run was a fund-raiser to benefit area charities.

Photo by Casey Case Some runners were dressed in shorts, for the Henry County Rotary Club's third annual Jingle Jog, held on the McDonough Square, on Dec. 4. The run was a fund-raiser to benefit area charities.

By Valerie Baldowski

vbaldowski@henryherald.com

More than 400 runners laced up their sneakers and took to the street, to raise money for area charities and deserving students.

The Henry County Rotary Club held its third annual fund-raising Jingle Jog 5K run, around the McDonough Square, as part of the "Santa Saturday" activities.

The race drew 478 participants, and raised $10,000, said Rotary Club President Kerry Arnold.

Some of the money will benefit A Friend's House, Haven House, and Helping In His Name Food Pantry, said Arnold.

"What we do is disburse the money to local charities, and also for regional and international causes as well," he said.

The funds collected will also go towards polio research as well as college scholarships for students at Henry County's 10 high schools, he added.

"We do a $500 scholarship for every high school in the county," continued Arnold.

He said the Rotary Club organizes the annual race, which was held on Dec. 4, to fulfill its mission of reaching out to others.

"This is one way to involve the community, and get in the donations to help the charities, to help people locally and around the world," said the club president.

The financial support is much appreciated during the holiday season, said Lori Miller, executive director of Helping In His Name Food Pantry.

"We're just so thankful," said Miller. "Today we served over 80 families in four hours. We have a great need in the community. This is the time of year when companies are downsizing, and people are losing their jobs."

She said some of the families who visit the pantry have been turned down for food stamps. "I would say we've probably reached our peak," Miller continued.

The facility needs widespread community support, she said.

"Obviously, it's a collaborative effort. No one can do it all," added the executive director.

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On the web:

www.helpinginhisname.org