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Local adult-recovery program saving lives

Photo by Jeylin White
The staff of the Paula Crane Life Enrichment Center, a non-for-profit adult recovery center in Morrow, hosted a “Holiday Open House,”  Thursday morning, in an effort to introduce the facility and it’s services to the community.

Photo by Jeylin White The staff of the Paula Crane Life Enrichment Center, a non-for-profit adult recovery center in Morrow, hosted a “Holiday Open House,” Thursday morning, in an effort to introduce the facility and it’s services to the community.

Staff members at the Paula Crane Life Enrichment Center, a non-profit adult-recovery center in Morrow, hosted a “Holiday Open House” Thursday morning, designed to introduce the facility and it’s services to the community.

According to Ava Allison, director of the center, the facility is part of a pilot program under the Clayton Center for Mental Health, that is designed for adults who are dealing with an addictive disease.

The addictions, said Allison, can vary from drug addition, to alcohol addiction, to sex addiction. “People who are new in recovery are trying to recover, not just from addictive substances, but from a lifestyle that revolves around using,” said Allison.

The center is located at 1792 Mount Zion Road, in Morrow, and first opened it’s doors to the community in early August. Since being introduced to the public, Allison said, the facility has received a slew of people looking for treatment.

“The Crane Center offers an array of services,” she said. Those services include: GED classes, money management courses, job-coaching, job-search support, basic computer skills, meditation, Yoga, Zumba, and recovery-support groups.

Allison said those who are recovering from addiction, or are in treatment, the last thing they want to do is go home and stare at four walls. Which is the reason why the center offers those in treatment, or recovery, the option to come to the facility and socialize with other recovering addicts, and meet sponsors.

“They can pick up a paddle and play Ping-Pong with somebody that’s new in recovery,” she said. “Or be mentored by someone that’s been in recovery for decades.”

She said most people, who walk into the facility, have never met anyone who has been in recovery for 30 years, and may even tell themselves that it is not even possible –– or they don’t know how to get there.

“We’re opening a new world to them, where it’s a safe place for them to come and learn how to live a life of recovery,” said Allison.

According to William White, senior research consultant for Chestnut Health Systems, a non-for-profit, behavioral health agency in Illinois, most people who complete treatment remain “precariously balanced between recovery and re-addiction” for years following discharge.

Sharon Hicks, of Morrow, who indicated that she had a substance-abuse problem, said she has been drug-free for more than 10 years. And from her personal experience, understands, all to well, what it’s likes to need additional support services to stay free from addictions.

She said since the center opened in August, she has been actively involved, and participates in many its programs. “I call this my second home,” said Hicks, “and my husband knows if he can’t find me –– he knows he can find me here.”

She said the center and it’s programs have helped her live a healthier lifestyle.

“This is just a good place for people to come, and utilize the services,” she said, “or just to come and hang out.”

Hicks said she particularly enjoys the “Sisters” recovery group. “It’s just a group of women, who come together and talk about the issues at hand,” she said. “It has been very enlightening for me.”

“I don’t believe that there is anyone out there, who is beyond hope,” said Allison. “I’ve seen it, over and over, the miracle of recovery.” She added that because the facility is a non-profit agency, all programs offered there are free.