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Sound, Sight, Vision

New airport exhibit ‘out of the ordinary’

Photo by M.J. Subiria Arauz
Crystal Bell, of New Jersey, studies an art piece with wood as its canvas, in an exhibit at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

Photo by M.J. Subiria Arauz Crystal Bell, of New Jersey, studies an art piece with wood as its canvas, in an exhibit at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

Splashes of blue hues combined with Chinese writing, and a rendering of the globe, seemed to overpower Danny Matucci, as he studied the drawing.

The Atlanta native was in the atrium of Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, when he happened to run across the drawing.

He said he first noticed the Chinese writing and colors, which were impactful. “I like the different use of the world,” he explained. “It looks interesting that you see the globe from a pencil perspective.”

Passenger, Crystal Bell, of New Jersey, said she is in Atlanta visiting for the holidays. Bell said she wouldn’t have noticed the artwork by just walking by. She said she really had to look for the exhibit through the bustling foot traffic at the world’s busiest airport.

Artist Craig Dongoski said he wanted his exhibit entitled, “Durations,” to be displayed at the airport, because it is an unusual setting. He said the space is like “Catch 22” because he gets a lot more foot traffic than he would at a regular art studio, but the exhibit is somewhat hidden by the on-the-go mentality most passengers have there. “I like paradoxes and ... things that are out of the ordinary,” he said.

Airport spokesman, DeAllous Smith, said the work links different media, such as sound and drawing. The artist, he said, considers the connection between speaking and writing to relate to the joining between sound of making the mark, and the drawing itself.

“The drawings are built by repeatedly reinterpreting the previous line drawn and are intended to be translated into sound by way of considering them as graphic scores,” added Dongoski.

Smith said the art displays basic-drawing approaches, but also uses materials like oil pencils and air brushing on birch. He said to get to the final product of each piece is a long-and time-consuming process.

The exhibit will be available at the atrium through Feb. 1, said Smith.

Katherine Dirga, art program manager at Hartsfield-Jackson, describes the exhibit as an internal expression. “This exhibit features 17 drawings that capture the connections among the spoken word, rhythm and drawings, and transform them into visual expressions,” she said.

Artist Dongoski said he hails from Decatur, Ill., and currently resides in Atlanta. He said he has been in the art arena for about 35 years.

He said his vision for each piece represents where he was at the time, and the sounds he experienced. He said for some of the pieces, he was in China and Germany. The “visuals of the sound” are raw sound such as scratching and tapping, interpreted in the pieces, he said.

He said he doesn’t have an ultimate message for the audience in this exhibit, but rather wants to provide the freedom for viewers to translate the art pieces themselves.

“I am not there to give answers to the work,” he said with a chuckle.

For more information about Craig Dongoski, visit http://drawingvoices.com.