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George who? What happened to Washington's birthday - Floyd and Mary Beth Brown

"If we do this [change the date of the Washington holiday celebration], ten years from now our school children will not know what Feb. 22 means. They will not know or care when George Washington was born. They will know that in the middle of February, they will have a three-day weekend for some reason. This will come." Theses prophetic words, passionately argued Tennessee Congressman Dan Kuykendall over 40 years ago have come true. Ask most school kids today why Feb. 22nd is special, and they will probably give you a blank stare.

The passage of the Uniform Monday Federal Holiday Law in 1968 triggered an avalanche that would bury "the father of our country," along with his guiding virtues and reminders of how and why the U.S. was born.

Washington inspired his contemporaries and countless Americans since, motivating others to emulate him. Washington set the gold standard for presidents and private character. "His example was as edifying to all around him as were the effects of that example lasting," wrote John Marshall in Washington's official eulogy. "The purity of his private character gave effulgence to his public virtues."

And, "More than any other," says Matthew Spalding, Ph.D., Washington "made possible our republican form of government."

When we grew up, celebrating George Washington's birthday was a big deal, and you couldn't help but be inspired him. We studied him, what he stood for and what he did to bring America to fruition. Mary Beth's grandmother, a patriotic American if you ever met one, loved that she shared the same birth date with Washington, always having a birthday cake covered with cherries and American flags.

When faced with the crisis of the Civil War, a council from Philadelphia came begging Washington's Farewell Address be read as a morale booster and bulwark to a teetering and fear-filled country. Tennessee Senator Andrew Johnson introduced the petition in the Senate. "In view of the perilous condition of the country," he said, "I think the time has arrived when we should recur back to the days, the times, and the doings of Washington and the patriots of the Revolution, who founded the government under which we live."

In his Farewell Address, Washington's advice to the nation was to uphold the Constitution and the rule of law, protect American independence and encourage morality and religion. The reading of the Farewell Address in the Senate remains an annual event, even if his advice is ignored there.

Since the 1968 law makes it a federal holiday, individual states dropped the ball in celebrating Washington's Birthday. Historian C.L. Arbelbide says, "For students in Texas, the renaming of the states Washington holiday to "President's Day" established the beginning of generations of children whose connection to Washington was fading." In the 2004-2005 school year, of Virginia's 134 school districts (Washington's own home state), only two listed on their internet sites the correct "Washington Birthday" title for the holiday. But Virginia's not alone, other states and their schools have similar records.

Across the country, school districts have dropped Columbus Day, Veterans Day and the misnamed, generic sounding, President's Day.

Remember Washington's deeds and heed his advice. A step in the right direction would be to correctly attach Feb. 22nd to the federal George Washington's Birthday holiday. This year, Washington's Birthday holiday falls on the 21st, the closest it can be to his actual birthdate, since Congress in 1968 changed the Federal holiday to the third Monday in February.

"His example is now complete," said John Adams," and it will teach wisdom and virtue to magistrates, citizens, and men, not only in the present age, but in future generations, as long as our history shall be read."

George Washington was a man of honor known for his great leadership and character.

"Wherever men love liberty, wherever they believe in patriotism, wherever they exalt high character, universal consent they turn to the name of George Washington," said Calvin Coolidge. "No occasion could be conceived more worthy, more truly and comprehensible American, than that which is chosen to commemorate this divinely appointed captain."

The Browns are bestselling authors –– and speakers. Together they write a national weekly column distributed exclusively Cagle Cartoons newspaper syndicate. .