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Morrow launches new web site, logo

Special photo
The City of Morrow’s new web site, www.cityofmorrow.com, went online this week. The head of the town’s tourism group said the web site is still a “work in progress,” and it is the first public piece of the city’s new “Come To Morrow” marketing campaign.

Special photo The City of Morrow’s new web site, www.cityofmorrow.com, went online this week. The head of the town’s tourism group said the web site is still a “work in progress,” and it is the first public piece of the city’s new “Come To Morrow” marketing campaign.

The City of Morrow has a new face on the World Wide Web, after months of planning by the city’s tourism officials.

The new web site, www.cityofmorrow.com, went online this week. It replaces a site that had been up for a decade. The new site has been under construction for months, and is part of a campaign to re-brand Morrow as a destination spot for people interested in shopping, recreation, business, education and the arts.

Morrow Business & Tourism Association President Michael Twomey cautioned that, although the new web site is online, it is not yet completely finished.

“It’s still a work in progress, and we’re planning on doing our official unveiling of the web site in January,” Twomey said. “There’s so much information that we still have to physically write up ourselves and put on the web site, such as the verbiage for all of the pages for each department.”

The new web site is the first piece of the city’s new “Come To Morrow” marketing campaign. The tourism department has been working with public relations consultants for months on a campaign designed to attract new residents, businesses and visitors to the town.

At the top of the site’s layout is the city’s new logo, with the “Come To Morrow” phrase under pictures of a graduation cap, a magnifying glass, a leaf, a musical note and arrows connecting a dollar sign with a euro sign. Two mechanical gears, remnants of the old “Geared for Quality Growth” logo, are also located of the main page.

“It’s a new, fresh look, and a much more professional look, for the city,” Twomey said. He added that one of the benefits of it is that city officials can add and subtract information from the web site themselves, rather than having to contract out that work to a third-party web designer.

The information available on the main page has also been moved around, in an effort to make information more easily accessible to users, according to Twomey.

There is a line of tabs going across the page, underneath the city logo, where people can find information about the city, events, maps, visiting the town, doing business in Morrow and relocating to the city. Each tab has a drop-down menu that has additional options for people to peruse for more information.

Links to information about Morrow’s mayor and city council, municipal court, obtaining permits and licenses, paying traffic citations and red light tickets, reporting code violations, and sending crime tips to the Morrow Police Department are located lower on the front page, under a “Your Government” heading.

The main page also includes links to web sites for other entities in the city, such as the William H. Reynolds Memorial Nature Preserve, Clayton State University, and its Spivey Hall concert facility, the Morrow Center conference facility, the Georgia Archives, the National Archives at Atlanta, and the Morrow Business and Tourism Association.

There are also information boxes, to let residents know when the Morrow City Council is meeting, as well as the latest updates on Georgia Department of Transportation construction work taking place in town. There are spaces at the bottom of the page, to include community news and information about new business ribbon cuttings.

“It was designed to be pretty self-explanatory, in terms of how to use the web site, but it’s still possible that we may offer tutorials to people who request it,” Twomey said.

The city’s top business and tourism official added that his department is accepting suggestions and comments on the layout from residents. People can contact the tourism association at (678) 422-7446, or (770) 968-1623.