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Congressman’s health fair saves lives

A man, who wishes to remain annonymous, debates the necessity to go to the hospital with Sgt. Jackson and Firefighter Cline after discovering he had high blood pressure at the 13th Annual Congressional Health Fair Saturday.

A man, who wishes to remain annonymous, debates the necessity to go to the hospital with Sgt. Jackson and Firefighter Cline after discovering he had high blood pressure at the 13th Annual Congressional Health Fair Saturday.

JONESBORO — It’s simple. Congressman David Scott’s 13th annual Congressional District Health Fair Saturday saved lives.

Just ask one of the several people sent to the hospital in an ambulance with a previously undiagnosed health condition.

One unidentified woman discovered she had dangerously high blood pressure and was rushed to Grady Hospital on the spot for treatment.

“The folks from Grady Hospital who were in there were able to say if she had not been here and they had not gotten to her, she would not be alive probably in the next two to three days,” said Scott. “That’s how serious it is and so that’s why I say when you are doing this kind of work it’s God’s work and He sets the people in place from all over to help and be successful.”

This year’s health fair took place Saturday from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. at Mundy’s Mill High School in Jonesboro.

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Joe Dixon with Georgia Power demonstrates the dangers of electricty to a group of onlookers with a home and power line model that showed the potential to shock at the 13th Annual Congressional Health Fair Saturday.

Hundreds of people crowded into the high school’s cafeteria to receive an estimated $2,000 in comprehensive care at no cost to them. Men and women were lining up around the corner to be screened for cholesterol, blood pressure, eye exams, breast cancer, prostate cancer, HIV/AIDS and more.

“I just got done taking a lung test,” said Jeannie Conway of Jonesboro. “I’ve taken about three tests, the body mass and cholesterol. Well, the cholesterol was not too good, but everything else was great.”

Conway also planned to take the kidney exam, eye exam and get screened for breast cancer by the end of the day.

“By coming out today, each person is going to learn something different about their own health and about what is important and how to access information that can help them better their health,” said Diane Iheanacho, representing Abbott.

Julie Fuzell of Jonesboro attributes her life and the life of her 7-year-old daughter to the second annual health fair.

“When we came (seven years ago) we were coming to get information for my father for Parkinson’s Disease. But because I was already pregnant and having trouble with my blood pressure we all stopped to have our blood pressure checked. And when I realized it was elevated I went on back home and it was extremely elevated. Because of that I ended up at Health Central.”

Fuzell was later told if she didn’t go to the hospital when she did, both she and her unborn daughter could have died while sleeping. Fuzell is now fighting breast cancer and attends every health fair to share with others how important preventative healthcare is.

Pleasure radiated from Scott as he watched people’s lives change as the community came together.

“Oh, it’s just a wonderful day,” Scott said. “It’s a very important day. I can’t express it any more succinctly than this being a tremendous God’s blessing to have this turn out, to have this participation, and to be able to have this wonderful weather.”

More than 100 healthcare providers were present, including Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Southside Medical Center and Southern Regional Medical Center.

“We’re saying an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure and you prepare for the storm before the hurricane is raging,” said Scott. “So when you see the people coming out the great testimony here is they are doing the preventive thing.”