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Noah’s Ark exhibit ongoing at Fernbank Museum

File Photo: Noah’s Ark Animal Rehabilitation Center, in Locust Grove, rehabilitated and released more than 480 animals in 2011. The shelter is taking part in a Wildlife Rescue Exhibit, at the Fernbank Natural History Museum, in Atlanta.

File Photo: Noah’s Ark Animal Rehabilitation Center, in Locust Grove, rehabilitated and released more than 480 animals in 2011. The shelter is taking part in a Wildlife Rescue Exhibit, at the Fernbank Natural History Museum, in Atlanta.

An effort is under way to bring attention to the Henry County facility dedicated to helping injured, and neglected, animals. The Noah’s Ark Animal Rehabilitation Center, Inc., in Locust Grove, is taking part in a Wildlife Rescue Exhibit, at the Fernbank Natural History Museum, in Atlanta, through May 6.

Allison Hedgecoth, husbandry manager at Noah’s Ark, recently gave a presentation, highlighting work at the facility at 712 L.G. Griffin Road. Her presentation centered on wildlife rehabilitation and release; domestic farm animals; and restoring injured exotic animals to health.

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File Photo: Marmoset monkeys are among the creatures housed in the 250-acre habit at Noah’s Ark Animal Rehabilitation Center, in Locust Grove. An effort is ongoing at Fernbank Natural History Museum, in Atlanta, to educate the public about the Henry County facility.

“Fernbank’s exhibit was amazing,” said Hedgecoth. “We were very excited to be a part of bringing attention to the plight of rescue animals and the need for skilled rehabilitation. In addition, it was a wonderful opportunity to share the Noah’s Ark story with the Atlanta community.”

Noah’s Ark also had a table-top display, staffed by volunteers and employees of the non-profit shelter. Hedgecoth said more than 480 animals were rehabilitated and released from Noah’s Ark, in 2011.

“All of our animals need some sort of rehabilitation,” said Hedgecoth.

The 250-acre habitat at Noah’s Ark houses more than 1,000 animals, including birds, tigers, bears, lions and snakes.

Rita Whitehouse, of Conyers, has been a volunteer at Noah’s Ark for a year. She assisted with the display at Fernbank.

“The Noah’s Ark display at the Wildlife Exhibit at Fernbank gave us an opportunity to share ... the challenges that they [animals] face in today’s environment, where humans are encroaching on their native territories,” said Whitehouse. “Many of the visitors at the exhibit were quite amazed that Noah’s Ark is a non-profit organization that operates with no government funding.”

Some visitors to the display, Whitehouse continued, agreed to be volunteers at Noah’s Ark, or to receive a Noah’s Ark newsletter.

“I hope that we are able to sign up more people who received information at our display, about our new membership program,” the volunteer said.

McDonough resident, Patty Ryan, began volunteering at Noah’s Ark in July of 2011. She described the shelter as a “serene” place for visitors.

“Even if you don’t love animals, when you leave there, you will better appreciate them and what we both have to offer each other,” said Ryan. “The domestic and exotic animals that they have there are either, rehabilitated and released, or they are given a loving, forever home.”

Hedgecoth continues to seek volunteer help, and financial support.

“We have a large number of supporters, but because of the economic recession, donations have gone down,” said Hedgecoth. “So, there is still a need for everyday funding, as far as feeding the animals and maintaining the habitat ...” Hedgecoth added. For more information, visit www.noahs-ark.org, or call (770) 957-0888.