0

Emergency responders, medical officials recognized for partnership

Photo by Curt Yeomans
Clayton County Commissioners presented a proclamation to officials from the county’s Fire and Emergency Services department and Southern Regional Medical Center, in recognition of their ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI) partnership, on Tuesday.

Photo by Curt Yeomans Clayton County Commissioners presented a proclamation to officials from the county’s Fire and Emergency Services department and Southern Regional Medical Center, in recognition of their ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI) partnership, on Tuesday.

Clayton County emergency services officials, and representatives of Southern Regional Medical Center (SRMC), were recognized with a proclamation from the Clayton County Commission this week, for life-saving work that has attracted the attention of American Heart Association officials.

A partnership between Southern Regional and Clayton County Fire and Emergency Services has been focusing on ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarctions. They are serious heart attacks, also known as STEMIs.

Recently, Clayton emergency responders took a STEMI patient to Southern Regional, where the patient was able to be treated with balloon-inflation treatment just an hour after first experiencing symptoms. Officials from the Atlanta division of the American Heart Association’s Mission: Lifeline program now intend to reference that case, during an upcoming STEMI presentation in India, according to county officials.

“A life was saved when they acquired research and analysis of an often-misdiagnosed cardiac condition ... [and that] helped EMS and hospital personnel quickly identify this omission for a distressed patient, and enabled them to administer proper treatment,” said Clayton Commission Secretary Shelby Haywood, who read the proclamation aloud, at a commission meeting, Tuesday.

The American Heart Association’s web site –– www.heart.org –– states that approximately 250,000 people experience a STEMI each year. It further explains that a STEMI is “the deadliest type of heart attack,” and is caused by a “prolonged period of blocked blood supply that affects a large area of the heart.”

Quick responses are needed to prevent a STEMI from resulting in death, or disability, according to the association. STEMIs can be stopped, if people who experience them receive “reperfusion therapy” techniques, such as clot-dissolving drugs, balloon angioplasty, and surgery, according to the group’s web site.

Battalion Chief Jacque Feilke, Clayton County Fire and Emergency Services spokesperson, explained that emergency services and hospital officials have been working together for several months to “ensure the fastest, and most-reliable treatment for patients suffering” from STEMIs.

“After months of collaboration between the two agencies, research and analysis protocols were revised and implemented to ensure that the highest-quality care was delivered to those in need,” Feilke added.

Fire department and Southern Regional officials have expressed pleasure at having a case they were involved in selected by Mission: Lifeline to be presented, along with other successful case studies, at a STEMI conference half-way around the world.

Feilke said hospital operations officials wrote in a letter to STEMI team members: “Not only was this an excellent patient outcome, but a great win for SRMC for accomplishing this ... This could not have been possible without the Clayton County Fire [Department], our ED [Emergency Department], our cath lab, the Lifenet wireless EKG [electrocardiogram] transmission system, and interventional cardiologist.”