0

Jonesboro honors Officer of the Year

Photo by Kathy Jefcoats
Jonesboro Police Chief Franklin Allen (right) presents Officer Brad Pair with an award as Mayor Joy Day looks on. Members of the City Council gave Pair a standing ovation.

Photo by Kathy Jefcoats Jonesboro Police Chief Franklin Allen (right) presents Officer Brad Pair with an award as Mayor Joy Day looks on. Members of the City Council gave Pair a standing ovation.

Brad Pair has always wanted to be a police officer. He may have finally found his niche in Jonesboro.

"I have family in law enforcement, and it has always been a passion of mine," said Pair. "It is satisfying to me to help the public in some way, to help them with their needs. Instead of just going on a call, I want to try to help them with their problems."

In recognition of his efforts "above and beyond the call of duty," Pair was recognized, Monday night, as the Officer of the Year by the Jonesboro City Council.

Pair, 39, grew up in McDonough, and graduated from Henry County High School. He served four years of active duty in the Army, and two in the National Guard, before fulfilling his dream as an officer at the McDonough Police Department.

More than four years ago, he joined the Jonesboro Police Department. Jonesboro Police Chief Franklin Allen said Pair is a valuable asset.

"He's got a great sense of community relations and skills," said Allen. "He goes above and beyond the call of duty. He takes the time with citizens and is always willing to help."

Pair was named Officer of the Month twice in 2011 –– in April and July. Allen implemented the peer-based voting system to recognize outstanding officers. Mayor Joy Day applauded the department's efforts.

"There is no greater honor than to be recognized by your peers," said Day.

Pair's wife, Jenae, two kids, Allie, 15, and Ashton, 2; father, Joe Pair, mother, Gay Goodman, and stepmother, Pam Pair, attended Monday night's presentation.

Jenae Pair said she is "extremely" proud of her husband.

"He loves knowing he helps people," she said. "When I ask him about his day, his response is always about how he's aided someone in some way. The value he gets out of that is what he brings back to the table."

Goodman has found she has to share her only son with the community.

"I know the businesses around here love him," she said. "He goes in all the stores and stops to check on them. I ran into a lady the other day who called him 'my baby.' I asked her who she was talking about. She said she was talking about Officer Pair. I said, 'That's my baby.'"

Goodman said she sends up daily prayers for her son, but feels comforted by the sense that Jonesboro is a safe community. She isn't above playing the role of protective mom, however.

"He's always telling me it's like there is a bubble around Jonesboro," said Goodman. "I pray to God every day to protect him and guide him. Don't let anything happen to him, because I'd hate to have to come up here."