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Volunteers, park staff renovate Stone Pavilion

After a series of renovations, the Stone Pavilion at Indian Springs State Park can now accommodate much larger, indoor gatherings.

After a series of renovations, the Stone Pavilion at Indian Springs State Park can now accommodate much larger, indoor gatherings.

The Stone Pavilion at Indian Springs State Park has undergone about $15,000 worth of renovations since November, thanks to the Friends of Indian Springs State Park, Friends of Georgia State Parks and Historic Sites, and Indian Springs’ park staff.

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The Stone Pavilion at Indian Springs State Park now features a modern kitchen area.

Indian Springs State Park Assistant Manager Beth Kane said the recent changes to the pavilion have increased not only its capacity, but its functionality, so that it is now able to accommodate various types of events, such as family reunions, church events, and weddings.

The Stone Pavilion at Indian Springs State Park is a covered open-air plaza that is flanked by two enclosed structures. According to Kane, until recently, when groups rented the Stone Pavilion for a gathering, they had access to only one enclosed area that accommodated about 40, while the other side was used for storage and off limits to the public. The renovations turned the storage space into a hospitality room with a capacity of 130 people that includes an industrial-sized refrigerator, stove, oven, sink, granite countertops, supply shelves and a wood-burning fireplace.

Due to the increased capacity and improved amenities of the Stone Pavilion, Kane said the price for a reservation has increased from $55 to $300 per day.

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The Stone Pavilion at Indian Springs State Park now has a capacity of 130 people, in one of the enclosed spaces, and also features a brand new kitchen area.

Friends of Indian Springs President Beverly Aldridge said the Friends of Georgia State Parks contributed $10,000 worth of funding through grants and credits. Aldridge said that for every hour of volunteer work done by the Indian Springs chapter, the group received $2 from the state group. She said the remainder of the funding came from donations and local fundraisers.

Kane said a couple of the major jobs on the project entailed restructuring the electrical wiring system and installing and leveling the countertops.

“The electrical wiring had to be redone so that there were outlets in the kitchen,” said Kane, who said electric work was done on a volunteer basis by Barry Montgomery, of Stockbridge. “We wanted to make sure we kept the integrity of the building intact.”

The pavilion, like many of the stone structures at Indian Springs State Park, was built by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) more than 70 years ago, according to Kane. The CCC was a public work relief program that sprung from the New Deal, a series of economic programs designed to help America emerge from The Great Depression in the mid-1930s. Kane said it is important to the park “to keep the integrity of the buildings as true to what they were [when built] as we can.”

Friends of Indian Springs State Park’s Gabriel Ivie said the group will be having a work day on Saturday, April 21 starting at 8 a.m., to tidy up the stone walkways around the perimeter of the pavilion, which are deteriorating in isolated locations. Anyone is invited to volunteer, and no park pass is required.

Kane said interested parties can call 1-800-864-7275 to make reservations at any Georgia state park, including Indian Springs. To contact Indian Springs State Park’s office, call (770) 504-2277.