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Clayton high school students selected for Governor's Honors Program

Photo by Jeylin White                            
Morrow High School sophomore Lauren Jennings (left) and junior Jessica Repress, were selected among 690 finalists throughout the state, by the Georgia Department of Education, for the 2012 Governor’s Honor Program.

Photo by Jeylin White Morrow High School sophomore Lauren Jennings (left) and junior Jessica Repress, were selected among 690 finalists throughout the state, by the Georgia Department of Education, for the 2012 Governor’s Honor Program.

Sophomore Lauren Jennings and junior Jessica Repress, both from Morrow High School, can’t wait for summer, when they’ll get a taste of college life.

Jennings and Repress were selected for the 2012 Governor’s Honors Program by the Georgia Department of Education . Both students said they found out earlier last week that they had been accepted into the program.

Also selected from Clayton County were Mt. Zion High School students Aliah James and Romie Williams, though neither could be reached for comment.

The teenagers will attend the program this summer at Valdosta State University, from June 24 through July 21. They will attend classes in their major, select another area for their minor, and participate in seminars, activities, and performances.

“I’m really excited,” said Jennings. “It will be nice to see what it will be like to live in the dorms.”

Repress said she has chosen to study Executive Management, as her major, but is not sure about her minor.

“I want to own my own family doctor practice,” said Repress. “In order for me to own my own business I need to understand the business side of things.”

Jennings has chosen to study Commutative Arts, as her major, and Education as her minor.

“I want to be a child psychologist,” said Jennings. “I chose my major because it will enhance my communication skills.”

Matt Cardoza, an education department spokesperson, said the the four-week summer program aimed at gifted students is almost universally described by its alumni as life-changing.

“This summer will be the 49th program, which began in the summer of 1964,” said Cardoza. “Georgia’s program is the longest continually running summer gifted program in the nation.”

Activities are designed to provide each participant with opportunities to acquire the skills, knowledge and attitudes to become independent, life-long learners, he said.

“GHP is fully-funded by the Georgia General Assembly, and operates at no cost to the participant,” said Cardoza.

More than 2,900 students from across the state, representing 1 percent of all sophomores and juniors of public, private, and home schools, were nominated last fall by their schools in 20 separate majors. Each student had to attend state-level interviews in January and February, where panels of judges and interviewers asked the students questions pertaining to the area they selected to study. Only 690 finalists were selected.

Cardoza said for more information, see the GHP website or contact Dale Lyles, director of GHP, at ghp@doe.k12.ga.us.