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Locust Grove Day draws an estimated 8,000

Special Photo
An assemblage of more than 175 food, arts, and crafts vendors, was on hand Saturday, for the 2012 Locust Grove Day celebration.

Special Photo An assemblage of more than 175 food, arts, and crafts vendors, was on hand Saturday, for the 2012 Locust Grove Day celebration.

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Special Photo Locust Grove Mayor and Mrs. Robert Price took part in a parade which kicked off Locust Grove Day festivities, Saturday.

With the number of participants attending the Locust Grove Day festival estimated at 8,000 or more, backers of the event are calling it a success. After all, the population of the city, located in the southern end of Henry County, has been recorded at only 5,400-plus.

“There were so many people ... you couldn’t hardly walk,” said Brenda Hammock, coordinator of the annual festival.

The 2012 version of the Locust Grove Day festival was held Saturday on the front and back lawns of Locust Grove City Hall. There were 192 vendors with their wares on display, ranging from barbecue sandwiches, to alligator meat.

There also were merchants selling jewelry, arts and crafts.

A parade kicked off the event, with Locust Grove children in the role of grand marshals. They rode on a float bearing a “Children are our future” banner.

According to Theresa Breedlove, one of the festival’s organizers, a Boy Scouts of America float won first place, and a $100 prize, in the float competition. Second place, and a $75 prize, went to an entry from Evans Pest Control. Third place was taken by the Henry County Sheriff’s Office.

There also were watermelon-and ice-cream eating contests. Kavita Olley and Jeffrey Harris, won $20 each in the watermelon-eating contest.

In the ice cream contest, Kirstyn Goodwin bested all other children challengers. Byron Fleming won the adult challenge in that contest.

“The weather was great,” said a buoyant Brenda Hammock, as conditions were such that children could fully enjoy the many activities earmarked for them.

“There were more activities for the children this year, more inflatables, and a “zip line,” said Hammock.

On the zip line, “They [children] would strap on a harness and slide down into an inflatable barricade,” she said. “There also was a gyro ball [a large inflatable ball], in which children would strap themselves inside ... and ride down hill.”