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100 Percent Star: Stockbridge’s Chase Wainscott an actor, model

Photo by Elaine Rackley 
Seven-year-old Chase Wainscott appeared in the movie “Field of Vision.” In the movie, Wainscott’s character befriends a little girl who has a magic camera. “Field of Vision” was filmed in February 2011, as a NBC Friday Night Movie. It is now available on DVD.

Photo by Elaine Rackley Seven-year-old Chase Wainscott appeared in the movie “Field of Vision.” In the movie, Wainscott’s character befriends a little girl who has a magic camera. “Field of Vision” was filmed in February 2011, as a NBC Friday Night Movie. It is now available on DVD.

“Let’s get right down to business,” demands a young boy, nattily attired in a business suit, as he strolls into a board room followed by other youngsters. They are greeted by adults seated around a table.

“We’re open for a merger, but we need to control 70 percent,” demands Stockbridge actor Chase Wainscott. He, and other child actors have leading parts in the popular 2011 Georgia Lottery “Merger” commercial. With the verbal backing of another local actor in that scene, Ariana Neal, of McDonough, who was featured in the Henry Daily Herald in March, the group got its wish.

In the commercial, Chase Wainscott portrays a business leader interested in a corporate merger. It could be said the home-schooled youngster drew from the work experiences of his father, Grant Wainscott, director of economic development for Clayton County.

“It was actually pretty fun to film,” said the articulate 7-year-old. “I was just a kid when we filmed the commercial ... I got to know the other kids when we were shooting ... They are really good actors.”

The Georgia Lottery commercial was filmed a year ago, and Chase’s portfolio now includes more commercials, movies and music videos. “I love [acting],” he said, during a recent interview at his home. “I do what the director says and I have to behave, too. It’s always important to be on your best behavior while you’re acting. ... I’m not shy, I like stage-acting because there are lots of people watching. When you are on TV, you don’t see the audience.”

The Stockbridge youngster said one of things he was impressed with while making the lottery commercial was working with other children his age. “Usually, I am somebody’s son in lots of commercials, movies, and TV stuff,” he said.

In an NBC Friday Night Movie last year, “Field of Vision,” Chase befriended a little girl who has a magic camera. “She could see events that happen in the future and past,” he explained. “It was an old video camera a guy gave her at an old bookstore.”

Other movies in which he has appeared include: “Red Neck Roots,” “Ghost Club,” and “Solomon’s Bunch.”

“We generally try to give a review of the movies to Chase, but we mostly concentrate on his lines,” said his father. “He needs to understand the basic concept of the movie, so he can relate to where his scenes fit in.”

In January, Chase was in “M3NSA,” a West African artist’s music video. He also appeared in vocalist Corey Durkin’s music video “Concentration in Love.” Both were shot in Piedmont Park in Atlanta.

Chase has appeared in the television pilots of “Fun World,” and “Amp.” He has worked in “Scattered,” “Bitter Taste of Magic,” and “The Unwelcome,” all short films. He has pitched such products as Pepsi, AT&T, Energy Excel, Scrubbing Bubbles, and Land -O- Lakes lunch meats.

Grant Wainscott said he and his wife, Courtney, are selective in the types of roles they allow their son to depict. “Every project that we have ever been on, they separate the children from the foul language,” said the elder Wainscott.

Chase also can be seen in a number of Belk’s Department Store ads. Some are on display in his bedroom, which is steeped in memorabilia and stuffed animals. He collects stuffed animals as a hobby, particularly frogs. He has more than 90 stuffed frogs. His sister, Amelia, 11, collects stuffed monkeys. Her mother said she has her heart set on becoming a gymnast.

In the meantime, it’s all a “big learning experience” for Chase.

“It’s been a fun adventure,” said Courtney Wainscott, the mother who home-schools Chase. “It’s usually a long wait to see the final product of [Chase’s] work ... I’m just so proud of him.”