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Jonesboro’s bells ready to jingle

Christmas parade returns Saturday

Jonesboro officials have begun warning residents they will have to adjust their travel patterns because of the city's Christmas parade and festival on Saturday.

Jonesboro officials have begun warning residents they will have to adjust their travel patterns because of the city's Christmas parade and festival on Saturday.

— It will feel a lot like Christmas in Jonesboro this weekend when the city awakens its dormant holiday parade and festival after a long slumber Saturday.

About 30 restaurants, organizations and entertainers will line Main Street while three high school marching bands, Cub Scout packs, government officials and Santa Claus pass by for the Jonesboro Christmas Parade and Festival. It is the first time in four years that the parade and festival have been held, and city Councilwoman Pat Sebo said the holiday event has been sorely missed by residents.

“It’s not going to be as big as it used to be because this is our first year doing it after a while, but it will certainly be large enough,” said Sebo, who is organizing the event.

photo

Curt Yeomans

The City of Jonesboro will host its first Christmas parade in four years Saturday. The parade, and an accompanying festival, will result in the shutting down of streets in the city's downtown corridor.

The festival will kick-off at noon, with vendors, face-painting booths, a rock-climbing wall and a moonwalk set up on Main Street, between West Mill Street and College Street. The parade will then begin at 4:30 p.m. at Jonesboro Middle School.

Sebo said the parade route will have participants coming down Stockbridge Road, and then north on McDonough Street. It will turn left and cross over the railroad tracks at Johnson Street and then come south on Main Street. It will cross back over the railroad at College Street and end at the Historic Clayton County Courthouse, the councilwoman said.

“We will then light the city’s Christmas Tree and children can sit in Santa’s lap and tell him what they want for Christmas,” said Sebo.