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Sensitive documents, meet the shredder

Residents can rip ’em up for free Oct. 27

Jonesboro Neighborhood Watch member Billy Powell and watch President Nancy Carr flip through documents Friday to see if they can find anything that needs to be shredded. The group will hold a free community shred event Oct. 27.

Jonesboro Neighborhood Watch member Billy Powell and watch President Nancy Carr flip through documents Friday to see if they can find anything that needs to be shredded. The group will hold a free community shred event Oct. 27.

— It’s time to get rid of those 20-year-old credit card bills which have been collecting dust since the first President George Bush was in office.

Jonesboro Neighborhood Watch and Oak Forest Neighborhood Watch will partner Oct. 27 to host a free “Community Shred Day” in the city at the Jonesboro First Baptist Church overflow parking lot at the corner of Cloud and College Streets. The event is being offered through a National Crime Prevention Center program to raise awareness about identity theft, said Jonesboro Neighborhood Watch President Nancy Carr.

She added this is the first time a “Community Shred Day” has been done by Jonesboro Neighborhood Watch.

“We wanted to do one to begin with, so we called around and got estimates on how much it would cost to get a shred truck,” said Carr. “They are extremely expensive so because we are members in good standing with the National Crime Prevention Center, I saw this offer we jumped on it.”

Carr explained the chance to bring documents to a free shredding event is a deal for the community because it typically costs $175 per hour to rent a shredding truck — which has to be rented for a minimum of three hours.

Neighborhood watch officials will be at the shredding site from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m., but the shredding truck will be there from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m.

People will be able to bring any old documents, such as bank statements or old checks, which have identifying information on them, including social security numbers and checking account numbers. Verizon wireless will also have representatives on hand to collect old cell phones which Carr said can either be recycled for parts, or distributed to elderly residents and victims of domestic abuse as emergency phones.

“Anything people bring with them will be shredded on site,” said Jonesboro Neighborhood Watch member Billy Powell. “It’s not like they haul it off and get to it later.”

Carr said neighborhood watch volunteers will be on hand to talk about the group and about identity theft with people who come by to shred documents. She added that anyone who wants to keep track of future Jonesboro Neighborhood Watch events, or who wants to talk with her about joining the group can contact her through the group’s Facebook page: Www.facebook.com/CityOfJonesboroNeighborhoodWatch/.