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Lake City residents enjoy free clutter disposal

Lake City Councilman Dwight Ginn tosses some old wood into a disposal bin for a resident during the city's cleanup day Saturday.

Lake City Councilman Dwight Ginn tosses some old wood into a disposal bin for a resident during the city's cleanup day Saturday.

— Jack Ring’s Lake City garage has breathing space again.

Ring brought two loads of junk to Lake City’s maintenance building Saturday for the city’s clean up day. After he brought his second load, which consisted of old two-by-fours and a wooden door, he felt relieved to be rid of the clutter.

He said his house was relieved too.

“My garage is out there breathing now,” Ring said.

A light but steady stream of residents came by the maintenance building to drop off the old, unwanted clutter for free as part of the city’s clean up efforts. By noon, two roll away dumpsters were nearly filled and six more were in various stages of filling up as well.

“There’s been about 100 people who have come by so far to drop off their junk,” Mayor Willie Oswalt said. “Everything they’ve been bringing — it’s been small.”

The city has been holding clean up days twice a year for 20 years, said Oswalt. As residents pulled up in their trucks, SUVs and midsized cars to drop off clutter, City Councilmen Dwight Ginn, Bobby Williams and J.B. Sowell and volunteers from the town’s public works department collected the junk and tossed it into the dumpsters. Oswalt cooked hamburgers and hot dogs on a grill for residents who wanted a bite to eat.

“If you don’t have stuff like this, it’ll be on the side of the road,” said Oswalt about why the city collected the clutter for free.

Residents who dropped off junk for disposal said they appreciated having the convenience of being able to drop it off in Lake City for free rather than driving to the county dump in Lovejoy, where they would have to pay a disposal fee.

“This is probably one of the best things they do for the citizens because it sure gets rid of a lot of stuff out of people’s yards,” Ring said.

Pat Wallace also made two trips to drop off unwanted junk, including some Chinese privet whose growth, she said, had “gotten away” from her in recent months. She also brought by several documents to be shredded by a paper shredding truck the city hired for the day.

“I think this is just marvelous,” Wallace said. “I remember when they started many years ago, there used to be only one dumpster and now they have all of these dumpsters because of how much stuff people bring in.”