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Subdivision gets official designation as Neighborhood Watch participant

A handful of residents of Glynn Ridge subdivision in Hampton stand with several Clayton County police officers after they unveiled the sign designating the neighborhood as a Neighborhood Watch participant. (Staff photo: Kathy Jefcoats)

A handful of residents of Glynn Ridge subdivision in Hampton stand with several Clayton County police officers after they unveiled the sign designating the neighborhood as a Neighborhood Watch participant. (Staff photo: Kathy Jefcoats)

HAMPTON — It took 15 years and several break-ins, but neighbors Jeff Des Vignes and Steve and Debbie Quick finally met earlier this year to combat crime in their Glynn Ridge subdivision.

“We knew each other to wave and such but we never knew our neighbors,” said Des Vignes.

Des Vignes and the couple, along with a handful of other neighbors, met Tuesday morning with several Clayton County police officers to unveil the sign officially designating their subdivision a member of the Neighborhood Watch.

Lt. Marc Richards said the group completed all the requirements and gained the first designation under the department’s restructured format.

“We streamlined the program and added more accountability,” he said.

Officer Ron Coloma is the community affairs liaison for sector 3, where the 33-house subdivision was built about 18 years ago. He helped the residents organize the program and coordinate meetings, starting in January.

After four meetings, the subdivision got its official designation with a Neighborhood Watch sign posted under the 25 mph sign at the entrance off McDonough Road. Des Vignes, the program coordinator for the subdivision, couldn’t have been happier.

“I’m really proud of this community we live in,” he said. “It took a few break-ins but after we came together, there have been no break-ins. We’re looking out for each other.”

Residents are eager to now get stickers for their homes and mailboxes to show Neighborhood Watch is active in their neighborhood.

The Quicks are also proud to be a part of a program that sets their minds at ease.

“It’s definitely brought us together and makes us aware of our surroundings,” said Debbie Quick. “It’s a good thing to know your neighbors better and their comings and goings. I think it makes for a safer environment.”

Steve Quick works second shift and he said it’s comforting to know his wife, while alone in the house, isn’t alone in their community.

“Key neighbors know when I’m at work, we’ve exchanged phone numbers,” he said.

The neighborhood also has a closed group Facebook page where residents can safely exchange information with each other.

“It’s a quiet neighborhood which is sometimes scary,” said Debbie Quick. “But it is also easier to tell a strange car or person from a car or person who is supposed to be there.”

Residents had a cookout in May to get to know each other better and plan a Sept. 21 yard sale from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Des Vignes said the group meets at the Lovejoy Library and plans to invite guest speakers who can provide quality of life information to residents. He said the program has been a success so far.

“We’re very grateful to the Clayton County Police Department,” he said. “Officer Coloma did a phenomenal job. I’m glad everyone participated to make it a success.”

For information on forming a Neighborhood Watch program, contact the Clayton County Police Department.