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Community groups receive grants for service projects

Representatives of five community organizations received grant awards totaling $25,000 from the Community Foundation of Greater Atlanta's Clayton Fund Wednesday.

Representatives of five community organizations received grant awards totaling $25,000 from the Community Foundation of Greater Atlanta's Clayton Fund Wednesday.

— Five groups whose names may be familiar to Clayton County residents received grants to fund their work for the community Wednesday.

The Community Foundation of Greater Atlanta’s Clayton Fund held its annual grantee reception in partnership with the Rotary Club of Clayton County. This year, the fund handed out $25,000 in grants to Jonesboro-based Arts Clayton, Historical Jonesboro/Clayton County and Southern Crescent Habitat for Humanity, as well as Forest Park-based Calvary Refuge Center and the Morrow-based Good Shepherd Clinic.

The money is split evenly so each group receives a $5,000 grant.

“We try to make the charities in the county be good stewards of the money given to them and try to have them do good works and certainly, the ones represented here today are exemplary organizations,” said Ben Loggins, chairman of Clayton Fund board.

Each group works to better the community in its own way. Arts Clayton promotes the arts within the county while Historical Jonesboro/Clayton County works to preserve its history. Calvary Refuge Center provides assistance to homeless residents while Southern Crescent Habitat for Humanity works to put disadvantage residents in homes and the Good Shepherd Clinic works to ensure they have access to medical care.

The award winners were chosen from a field of 12 applicants, said Grants Committee Co-Chairwomen Kathy Wages and Carol Hatfield.

Applicants must first submit a three-page letter of intent to the committee outlining what their organization does in the community and what projects they would fund with the grant money. If the committee likes what it reads in a letter of intent, the organization is then asked to submit a full application to be further evaluated in what is essentially a second round of the selection process.

“A full application is a big deal,” said Hatfield.