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Huge crowds expected for Humane Society quilt sale

Quilts and Fixins' Cat and Dog Quilt Sale will feature several animal-themed quilts as per tradition Saturday.

Quilts and Fixins' Cat and Dog Quilt Sale will feature several animal-themed quilts as per tradition Saturday.

— Part of the fun of making quilts for the Clayton County Humane Society for Liz Eaton is seeing the long line of people waiting at Quilts and Fixins doors on the morning of its Cat and Dog Quilt Sale.

The store’s staff and customers spend a year making about 300 animal-themed and non-animal-themed quilts, napkins, table runners, bags, place mats and pillows for the sale, which is a fundraiser for the Humane Society. They put in long hours on each quilt, first to sew each panel together and then to sew elaborate stitch patterns into the quilt.

photo

Curt Yeomans

Quilts and Fixins employee Liz Eaton uses a long-arm machine to sew patterns into a quilt Tuesday for the store's ninth annual Cat and Dog Quilt Sale. The event, to be held Saturday, will raise money for the Clayton County Humane Society.

photo

Curt Yeomans

Quilts and Fixins owner Jeanne Lowery shows off a Scottish Terrier-shaped pillow one of her customers made for the store's annual Cat and Dog Quilt Sale fundraiser for the Clayton County Humane Society. The sale will be held Saturday.

The fruit of their labor is the crowds that pack the store in the first hours of the sale, leaving items quickly picked over.

“It’s really fun to watch the rush for the quilts as soon as the doors open, because this store will be packed,” said Eaton, a Quilts and Fixins employee.

Her co-worker, Janice Van Meter, added, “It people find something they like, they better pick it up and hold onto it because it will be gone in seconds if they don’t.”

This year’s quilt sale will be held Saturday from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. at Quilts and Fixins, 7986 North Main St. in Jonesboro. Store owner Jeanne Lowery said the goal is to raise more than the $16,000 raised through last year’s sale. Humane Society officials consider the event to be one of their three biggest fundraisers of the year, along with their spring and fall yard sales.

“Every year, we seem to raise a little bit more than we did the year before so it’d be great if we could raise $17,000 this year,” Lowery said.

Lowery echoed Eaton’s and Van Meter’s statements about the early morning crowds on the day of the sale. It is likely that the initial crowd will have bought any popular items by 10 a.m. and the stacks of remaining items will be heavily thinned out, she said.

“I think the reason why so many people come early is because everything is one of a kind,” Lowery said. “If people want something in particular, then they need to get here early.”