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Fifty families in Clayton, Henry benefit from food drive

Second from left is Clayton County police Capt. Rebecca Brown, Clayton County Solicitor General Tasha Mosley, AKA/PAO chapter President Angelica Clark and Fannette Morris of Parlor Retreat in Jonesboro. Helping the women with canned goods are members of Mosley’s staff. (Staff Photo: Kathy Jefcoats)

Second from left is Clayton County police Capt. Rebecca Brown, Clayton County Solicitor General Tasha Mosley, AKA/PAO chapter President Angelica Clark and Fannette Morris of Parlor Retreat in Jonesboro. Helping the women with canned goods are members of Mosley’s staff. (Staff Photo: Kathy Jefcoats)

JONESBORO — Fifty families in Clayton and Henry counties will enjoy a Thanksgiving meal like the rest of the country next week, despite being homeless.

Clayton County Solicitor General Tasha Mosley’s office partnered with Alpha Kappa Alpha, Psi Alpha Omega and National Organization of Black Law Enforcement to feed 25 families in each county.

The organizations took in cases of canned vegetables and broth, boxes of instant potatoes, macaroni and cheese and rice, and bags of stuffing and dry beans. The families are also treated to cake mixes and canned frosting.

A couple read about the food drive in Clayton News Daily and called Mosley to donate 100 turkeys to round out the holiday menu.

Fannette Morris of Parlor Retreat in Jonesboro heard about the project and asked Draga Laboratories to donate Basic Hair Care products. Morris said the products are suitable for all hair types and ages.

“It’s important to look good because when you look good, you feel good,” she said. “If you look nice, you automatically feel better.”

Clayton County police Capt. Rebecca Brown represents NOBLE and said the organization was happy to help.

“The organization voted ‘yes’ to be on board for helping,” she said. “That’s what it’s all about, helping the community. I love the response.”

Mosley said the response was overwhelming to the point she and her staff feigned exasperation at the delivery of yet another box of canned goods. Some people donated above what was asked to make up a Thanksgiving meal, bringing in cans of chili, spaghetti, soup, meats and fruits.

Nothing will go to waste, Mosley said.

Food stamp allotments have decreased in amounts from $30 to $80 a month, depending on the family size, she said, so people are still hurting financially.

“Things are tough,” Mosley said. “The market is still tight and people are looking for anything in the way of jobs. Some people are making it but just barely keeping their heads above water. This donation will keep their money in their pockets that can be put toward something else they may need.”

Angelica Clark, president of AKA and its PAO chapter, said the main purpose of the sororities is community service.

“We’re about service to all mankind,” Clark said. “When we see the families we are able to help, they are thankful and gracious, happy to receive whatever we bring them. And we’re happy to help out whenever we can.”

Mosley said the groups will continue the partnership into Christmas.

“We will probably serve well over 100 families at Christmas,” she said. “We will feed them and make sure the kids get toys. The average family has four kids and we have a list from social workers of what they want. We try to meet that list, as long as it’s reasonable.”