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Morrow Business and Tourism Association dazzles while helping residents at Fashionatta

Professional model Melissa Yard displays an outfit Sunday during the Morrow Business and Tourism Association’s fifth annual Fashionatta fundraiser for Clayton County Family Care. (Staff Photo: Curt Yeomans)

Professional model Melissa Yard displays an outfit Sunday during the Morrow Business and Tourism Association’s fifth annual Fashionatta fundraiser for Clayton County Family Care. (Staff Photo: Curt Yeomans)

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Professional model Michael Sibila shows off a suit Sunday during the Morrow Business and Tourism Association’s Fashionatta fundraiser Clayton County Family Care. (Staff Photo: Curt Yeomans)

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Willet Honda South co-owner Kelly Willet models an outfit Sunday during the Fashionatta fundraiser for Clayton County Family Care. (Staff Photo: Curt Yeomans)

MORROW — Southern Crescent residents got a lesson in giving while watching beautiful people strut up and down a catwalk Sunday.

The Morrow Business and Tourism Association hosted its fifth annual Fashionatta fundraiser for Clayton County Family Care at the Morrow Center. Professional and community models showed off fashions from Belk department store in McDonough to raise money for the group, which offers emergency assistance to people who find themselves temporarily in need.

But Clayton County Family Care Executive Director Cynthia Jenkins said the money raised at the event isn’t as valuable as the opportunity it provides to make people aware of what the organization does.

“The exposure outweighs the financial impact at this point in time,” said Jenkins.

Although the plight of Clayton County residents in need of temporary assistance to pay utility or rent bills is a serious issue, attendees found opportunities to have fun at the event.

However, probably no one showed they were having a good time as much as “We Are Clayton” publisher Gerrian Hawes. She didn’t hold back her enthusiasm for the models as they walked the runway.

When Hawes, who sat in the front row, saw something she liked, she screamed, “Yesssss. Yes. Yes. Yes.”

If she saw a community model she was friends with, she screamed, “You better work it, girl.”

When she wanted to get a laugh out of a model, she’d tell them to “work it” and then scream, “OK, you can stop it now. No seriously stop. Stop!”

For Hawes, it was all about having a good time, and enjoying the opportunity to come together as a county to support needy residents.

“It was a good break from the strain that we sometimes see in the county, and it was a good opportunity to come together for the common good,” said Hawes. “It’s style. It’s high fashion. It’s helping people who need our help.”