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Lee Street Park amphitheater plans presented

This is the rendering of the Lee Street Park amphitheater. It will feature a curved metal roof with stone trim. (Special Photo)

This is the rendering of the Lee Street Park amphitheater. It will feature a curved metal roof with stone trim. (Special Photo)

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There will be two Farmers Market areas with a metal roof. (Special Photo)

JONESBORO — Lee Street Park amphitheater plans are coming together.

Mayor Joy Day introduced the proposed look of the new building to the Jonesboro City Council Thursday.

It will feature a curved, metal roof over the stage, concession area and restrooms. It will have stone trim and be wired for sound and lights with a stage height of 42 inches.

“We’ve planned for very low maintenance — metal and stone,” Day said.

There was discussion about changing the storage behind the stage into to a place for performers to store their instruments and change. To make up for the loss of storage area, Day suggested possibly shrinking the concession space to add a storage unit.

The amphitheater will be flanked by the air conditioned concession area and restrooms. Exhaust fans are planned for the two smaller building to help pull warm air out.

Drawings of the farmers market were also introduced. They are curved metal roof areas with parking spots that run parallel to the structures.

Day said sellers can back their cars into the spots to sell their wares or carry them to the pavilion. “These will offer shelter from the weather and give shade,” Day said.

Day said the outside of the park will feature lighting to match the look of the city’s existing lamps, but inside the lights will be more modern with LED bulbs.

Officials have been working for more than a year on the redevelopment of the park.

Councilwoman Pat Sebo said they’re hoping to put out a bid for the construction in July and possibly break ground in August.

She said right now the city is waiting for the school system to restore two tennis courts and move the basketball court.

That agreement came about when it was discovered part of the Perry Center was built on city land.

“We said we would not move one shovel of dirt until the basketball court was moved,” Sebo said.

In March the council approved about $1.4 million for work at the park.