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Stately Oaks hosts Native American Heritage Day

Kathy Hill demonstrates how to make Fry Bread on rocks over an open flame during the Native American Heritage Day at Stately Oaks Saturday. (Staff Photo: Heather Middleton)

Kathy Hill demonstrates how to make Fry Bread on rocks over an open flame during the Native American Heritage Day at Stately Oaks Saturday. (Staff Photo: Heather Middleton)

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Dennis Byrd retells stories about Creek Indians while dressed in the Indian’s garb. (Staff Photo: Heather Middleton)

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Betty Mundy shows how finger weaving to done during the Native American Heritage Day at Stately Oaks. (Staff Photo: Heather Middleton)

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Betty Mundy demonstrates finger weaving. (Staff Photo: Heather Middleton)

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Sydney McMillian, 11, helps Breanna LaVaughn grind corn at the Native American Heritage Day. (Staff Photo: Heather Middleton)

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Paula Sumner has been carving wood for more than 30 years. This is one of the many pieces she created using match sticks. (Staff Photo: Heather Middleton)

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Sherry Gomez shows visitors how to make thread using raw wood at the Native American Heritage Day at Stately Oaks. (Staff Photo: Heather Middleton)

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Bob Wantland creates Native American bags with traditional beading at Stately Oaks Saturday. (Staff Photo: Heather Middleton)

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Winnie Auguste cooks vension on a spit over an open flame Saturday during Stately Oak’s Native American Heritage Day. (Staff Photo: Heather Middleton)

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Dennis Byrd describes native Creek Indian clothing at Stately Oaks. (Staff Photo: Heather Middleton)

JONESBORO — Stately Oaks went further back in time Saturday to celebrate Native American Heritage Day.

The festival featured several demonstrations including finger weaving, wood carving, beading, rock cooking and corn grinding.

Dennis Byrd, dressed as a Creek Indian, gave musket demonstrations and talked about the history of the Creek Indian tribe.

Clayton County’s earliest residents were Creek Indians whose tribes inhabited central Georgia before the mid-19th Century. The village at Stately Oaks was created in the early 1980s by Native American Heritage Day founder Ted Key as a way to teach school children about the Creek Indians and their traditions.

Though the village suffered some damaged from the icy winter weather, organizers were able to get nearly every repaired in time for the festival.

For more information about Stately Oaks, visit historicaljonesboro.org.