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Rex Mill Middle students return from UGA ag tour

Students using the food science curriculum at Rex Mill Middle recently paid a visit and conducted their own experiments in the department of food science at the University of Georgia. (Special Photo)

Students using the food science curriculum at Rex Mill Middle recently paid a visit and conducted their own experiments in the department of food science at the University of Georgia. (Special Photo)

REX — Several potential engineers and food scientists returned this week from the University of Georgia, where they learned about careers in agriculture.

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Rex Mill Middle student Marshall Thornton takes a whiff of an mystery substance during an activity at the University of Georgia, where students visited this month to learn about agriculture. His classmates Augstin Munoz, to his right, Kristin Bradley, in the background, and Jackson Bui, behind him, also took part in the activity. (Special Photo)

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Rex Mill Middle students Ivy Bui, left, and Camille Dunbar learn about science in an experiment using Gummy Worms at the University of Georgia. (Special Photo)

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Rex Mill Middle students pose with their tour guides during a recent trip to the University of Georgia to learn more about agriculture sciences. (Special Photo)

The group of 44 Rex Mill Middle students toured the university campus, accompanied by science teacher, Janice Mitchell, and other chaperones.

Mitchell said the trip was designed to complement the school’s science, technology, engineering and math program in which students learned about the use of a variety of STEM careers in agriculture.

The group toured the university’s college of agriculture and participated in experiments and demonstrations at its food science department.

Mitchell said the students were about to experience first-hand how research is used in real world applications — from the science lab to the farm and to the kitchen table.

She attended Food and Drug Administration and National Science Teacher Association training in Washington D.C. last year. Eversince, she has been implementing a food science curriculum in her classroom and trained 16 other teachers in the district to do the same.

Mitchell teaches students about the “4 C’s of Food Safety” — clean, chill, cook and combat cross-contamination.

“There are so many majors in the college of agriculture that many of my students are not aware of during their early school life,” she said. “By capturing their interest in middle school, they can make better choices in the selection of rigorous math and science courses in high school. This will help them to achieve success and meet the demands of evolving science careers.”