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The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation is looking for a preservation-minded buyer to purchase and rehabilitate the Alston-Wiley House in Sparta, located at 180 Maiden Lane.

ATLANTA — The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation is looking for a preservation-minded buyer to purchase and rehabilitate the Alston-Wiley House in Sparta, located at 180 Maiden Lane. The historic house is being sold through the Georgia Trust’s Revolving Fund program, which provides effective alternatives to demolition or neglect of architecturally and historically significant properties.

The Alston-Wiley House was built circa 1817 by Colonel Robert West Alston, a lifelong friend of President Andrew Jackson. Originally constructed in the Federal style, the two-story house has seen several modifications over the years. A significant remodel just before the Civil War changed the orientation of the main entrance from the north to the east facade, and a Victorian-era porch was added.

The interior of the house retains many of its historic features including mantels, original plaster and hardwood flooring. The one-of-a-kind bifurcated staircase in the central hall is the house’s most unique feature. The original L-shaped plan, roof lines and the decorative molding of the main cornice mirror those of another Federal style residence—the historic Church-Waddel-Brumby House in Athens.

The house is in overall fair condition, but it will require significant interior rehabilitation including repair of some plaster work, repainting and repairs to the cornice.

The Alston-Wiley House is available for $130,000. It is approximately 5,216 square feet and sits on four acres. The house is a contributing property within the Sparta Historic District, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and may be eligible for state and federal rehabilitation incentives. The buyer is required to sign a Rehabilitation Agreement and all work done to the property must abide by the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation.

For more information about the Alston-Wiley House, visit www.GeorgiaTrust.org or contact Dennis Lovello at dlovello@georgiatrust.org or 404-885-7819.

The Georgia Trust’s Revolving Fund Program was established in 1990 to provide effective alternatives to demolition or neglect of architecturally and historically significant properties by promoting their rehabilitation and enabling owners of endangered historic properties to connect with buyers who will rehabilitate their properties.

The Georgia Trust accomplishes this goal by either accepting property donations or by purchasing options on endangered historic properties. The properties are then marketed nationally to locate buyers who agree to preserve and maintain the structures. Protective covenants are attached to the deeds to ensure that the historic integrity of each property is retained, and purchasers are required to sign rehabilitation agreements based on the work to be performed on the structure.

Founded in 1973, the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation works for the preservation and revitalization of Georgia’s diverse historic resources and advocates their appreciation, protection and use.

As one of the country’s leading statewide, nonprofit preservation organizations, the Trust generates community revitalization by finding buyers for endangered properties acquired by its Revolving Fund and raises awareness of other endangered historic resources through an annual listing of Georgia’s “Places in Peril.” The Trust recognizes preservation projects and individuals with its annual Preservation Awards and awards students and professionals with the Neel Reid Prize and Liz Lyon Fellowship. The Trust offers a variety of educational programs for adults and children, provides technical assistance to property owners and historic communities, advocates for funding, tax incentives and other laws aiding preservation efforts, and manages two house museums in Atlanta (Rhodes Hall) and Macon (Hay House). To learn more, visit www.georgiatrust.org.

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