JONESBORO — A Clayton County grand jury has indicted six men charged in five alleged murders, according to court documents.

All the indictments were returned against men 30 years old and younger.

• Dontez Davaunte Taylor, 20, of Jonesboro was indicted in the April 5 shooting death of Sean Seats. The indictment alleges Taylor did not commit the crime alone, but a second suspect was unknown to the grand jury at the time of the case presentation.

Taylor is charged with malice and felony murder, four counts of aggravated assault, six counts of Violation of Street Gang Terrorism and Prevention Act and seven counts of possession of a firearm during commission of a felony.

According to the indictment, the charges are affiliated with gang activity. Taylor is allegedly associated with the criminal street gang known as the “Bloods.” He is being held in Clayton County Jail without bond.

• Keelan Albert Andrews, 24, of College Park was indicted in the March 21 shooting death of Ricardo Nicoleau.

Andrews was convicted of burglary in 2012 by Fulton County Superior Court and given a five-year sentence, according to the Georgia Department of Corrections.

Andrews is charged with malice murder, two counts of felony murder, aggravated assault, possession of a firearm by a convicted felon and four counts of possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony. He is being held in Clayton County Jail without bond.

• Urihann Velasco, 21, of Ellenwood was indicted in the March 5 death of Quang Popham. Velasco allegedly beat Popham to death with a hammer.

He is charged with malice murder and felony murder. A bond hearing for Velasco is set for Aug. 8.

• Marquis Antonio Acree, 30, of Atlanta and Fernando Cartavious Bennefield, 23, of Palmetto were indicted in the shooting death of Timothy Carthan Oct. 3.

Both are previous offenders. Acree has an extensive criminal background including a 2003 felony conviction of theft by receiving stolen property, possession of cocaine, forgery and impersonating another, according to the Georgia Department of Corrections and Clayton County court records.

At the time of the shooting, Bennefield was on probation as a felony first offender for aggravated assault. He was convicted in Fulton County Superior Court.

Acree is charged with two counts of felony murder, two counts of aggravated assault, malice murder, possession of a firearm by a convicted felon and two counts of possession of a firearm during commission of a felony.

Bennefield is charged with malice murder, two counts of felony murder, two counts of aggravated assault, possession of a firearm by a first offender probationer and two counts of possession of a firearm during commission of a felony.

Both men are in Clayton County Jail without bond. A bond hearing is set for Bennefield July 24.

• Courtavious Diquan Candis, 21, of Atlanta was indicted for the April 22 shooting death of Michael King Jr.

At the time of the shooting, Candis was on probation as a felony first offender in Clayton County Superior Court for Violation of Georgia’s Controlled Substances Act.

Candis is charged with malice murder, three counts of felony murder, possession of a firearm by first offender probationer, two counts of aggravated assault and two counts of possession of a firearm during commission for a felony.

He is being held in the Clayton County Jail without bond. He was appointed an attorney Friday.

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