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It is so much easier to remain in our self-pity. It is so much easier to cling to our problems. It is so much easier to give up and succumb to the odds.

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I have a history with gas. I mean the kind you put into your car’s tank. In my youth, I was a gas pump jockey before I became a radio disc jockey or a TV news jockey.

Glimpses back to childhood always bring an odd remembrance of some kind. Sometimes when I go into our kitchen at night, I will think of the kitchen of my childhood home.

This is all political theater and bad theater at that. Democrats are going through the motions of impeachment, hoping to thwart the president’s re-election.

Well, I opened a can of worms. A few weeks ago, I listed a few of the common spelling mistakes that make us laugh (or groan). Since then, my mailbox runneth over with more. So before the “statue” of limitations runs out (where IS that statue, anyway?) let’s review a few from the Bad Spelling Hall of Fame.

Two months after her heroic husband was killed on United Flight 93, Lisa Beamer was asked to say a few words at a Women of Faith Conference in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. You remember that Lisa was the 32-year-old widow of Todd Beamer, who was one of those killed trying to overcome the terrorists on September 11, 2001.

When I was born to my parents – late in life, folks used to like to say – they had a college freshman, a high school student and one in seventh grade.

If you are up to your gullet with all the mudslinging in Washington, you have come to the right place. I am right there with you. I have spent enough time in and around D.C. to know the impeachment controversy involving Donald Trump is partisan political posturing by Democrats and Republicans.

Back when reruns were a staple of summer programming, television networks aired repeats of their programs, giving viewers another opportunity to see what they had already seen. Democratic politicians are now conducting their own version of reruns.

So we paused on Sept. 11, and we pause today, 18 years later, to reflect on the meaning of this horrible atrocity.

They are all gone now; the men (and one woman) who were major influences in my early journalism career. The last two died within weeks of each other. They were Jack Perkins and Sander Vanocur, both veterans of NBC News where I started as a copyboy.

By definition, what 14 million viewers watched on TV last Thursday night was not a debate -- not even close.

What a storm of memories an old tin pan can bring churning through a moment in time.

It was a quick, foolhardy decision born of a country girl who wanted to see more of the world than pasture fences, cows and hayfields. I came to regret it during all the nights I cried, homesick for all of that as well as the bullfrogs, crickets and dirt roads.

President Trump was right to cancel a “secret” meeting with leaders of the Taliban and the Afghan government following two bomb attacks by the terrorist group that killed 10 civilians, an American soldier and a Romanian service member in heavily fortified Kabul.

First, in the aftermath of these horrific shootings, finger-pointing is not helpful and only more divisive.

Too many times these days, we are following a news story being reported by the national media when one or the other of us will have a question such as, “How did this start in the first place?” or “Why did she do that?”


One doesn't have to be a cynic to be cynical about the Justice Department's decision not to hold former FBI Director James Comey accountable for what an Inspector General report called his violation of FBI policies and his setting a "dangerous example" in order to "achieve a personally desired outcome."

At least once a day, I think of something Mama taught me — like how to match checks and stripes when I sewed.

During a December 2015 debate among Republican presidential candidates in Las Vegas, former Florida governor Jeb Bush said to Donald Trump: “You can’t insult your way to the presidency.”

Sometimes it takes a long time before you’re able to pay forward a kindness. This one took me 12 years to repay.

After the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, investigators discovered that the lone man assigned to guard the president, John Parker, had abandoned his post to watch the play from an adjacent box at Ford’s Theater. Worse, at intermission, Parker adjourned to a nearby saloon to have drinks with some friends. It was during the second act that John Wilkes Booth entered the president’s box and shot him.

Former South Carolina governor and UN Ambassador Nikki Haley has urged President Trump and Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-MD to stop exchanging insults over conditions in Baltimore.

A couple of years ago, Tink and I had the opportunity — which turned out to be an honor and a privilege — to work with Dolly Parton on a television project.

I know he is a longtime reader of this space and should he be doing so this week, I want Sen. Johnny Isakson to know he is in our prayers (assuming mine gets past the ceiling.) The senator is currently rehabbing after a fall at his residence in Washington, breaking four ribs. In the current dysfunctional political environment where each side is trying to out-scream the other, Johnny Isakson is one of the sane voices in Washington and one of the most respected. Also, the Woman Who Shares My Name loves him better than apple dumplings. You say something negative about her friend and she will put a skillet against your skull. Don’t even think about it. Get well soon, Senator. ...

The Washington Post, which has done everything in its dwindling power with articles, editorials and columns denouncing, demeaning and attempting to destroy President Trump, appears to have temporarily — but only temporarily — raised the white flag. A headline following former Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s appearance before two House committees said: “Democrats struggle to figure next move against Trump after Mueller Hearing falls flat.”

There’s something awful special about seeing the South from the pavement of asphalt back roads mostly forgotten by the majority of population. It is there among scrub pines, pecan trees and cattle watering in a nearby stream, that you will behold a sight that soothes the soul.

For safety reasons, fire marshals control the number of people who can occupy a building at any one time. We’ve seen what happens when crowds get too large and a fire breaks out, causing panic and often death. So why not control the crowd illegally entering America?

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